Evaluate Your Learning

Learn From Your Peers!

1. Add your Python Model image to a Jamboard, accessed HERE. Make sure that you set your model image, so that others can view it with sticky notes. Do that by:

  • Clicking SHARE in the upper right corner of the page.

  • Under GET LINK, click CHANGE.

  • Click ANYONE WITH A LINK CAN EDIT

If you need Jamboard guidance, see the tutorials linked at the bottom of this page.

2. Then "take a walk" around your peers' Jamboards in our folder. They will have done some things differently from you. As you look and learn, choose 5 Jamboards, on which you will leave a sticky note. Post your sticky on the right edge of the board, and it should include:

  • One note of praise: What did you like about what they did?

  • One question: Is there something you wonder about how they chose to represent their system?

  • One critique: What is something they might add, take away, or change?

How had your understanding changed?

How has your answer to our Big Question changed? Complete the prompts below in your SCIENCE JOURNAL using what you have learned from this entire lesson to support your answer.
  1. What is one thing that you learned from your peers?

  2. What is one thing that you have learned from the experts?

  3. What is one question you STILL have about Burmese pythons in Florida?

1. Build a Jamboard

Google Jamboards are a great way to easily create visual models to get your thinking on the page.

Our Jamboard folder is linked HERE. To access the tool, click the "+NEW" button in the upper left corner. Scroll down to the MORE option in the tools, and once you click that, you should see Google Jamboard.

A tutorial video is linked above so that you can see how it might be done, but get creative and HAVE FUN!

2. Create Your Concept Map

Now, use your Jamboard to create a concept map, which connects the variables you have collected in your python research. Use the video above to learn how to make a great concept map.

3. Add your concept map to your science journal

Now, use your Jamboard to create a concept map, which connects the variables you have collected in your python research. Use the video above to learn how to make a great concept map.

We want to hear from you! Send us your questions, photos, data, artwork, and observations on Twitter by tweeting @conservancyswfl